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LEDs – Conclusions (Part VI)

CHAPTER I – INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER II – LITERATURE REVIEW

CHAPTER III – DATA COLLECTION

CHAPTER IV – METHODOLOGY

CHAPTER V – ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

CHAPTER VI – CONCLUSIONS

The LED fixture system has met nearly all of its requirements on schedule and below budget.  It will enter Phase 3 on 10 December 2013, at which time the remaining requirements will be tested and verified.  This system is cost-effective, meets user needs, and appears to meet coral requirements as well.  A side-by-side comparison of an Acropora coral (Tyree Pink Lemonade) shows significant growth and coloration improvement (Figure 47).  The photos were taken slightly over a month apart (3 November 2013 and 8 December 2013) with the left side under metal halides and the right side under LEDs.  All other corals in the aquarium are responding similarly (Figure 48).

Figure 47:  Acropora under Metal Halides (Left) and LEDs (Right) a Month Apart

Figure 47:  Acropora under Metal Halides (Left) and LEDs (Right) a Month Apart

Figure 48:  Corals Successfully Growing under LED Light System after Two Weeks

Figure 48:  Corals Successfully Growing under LED Light System after Two Weeks

In addition to coral health and coloration, the other invertebrates have responded well to the LED lighting.  The Cerith snails have laid two batches of eggs during the two-week LED test period, which was typical for approximately every six months of metal halides.  The Nerite and Collumbellid snails have also increased their egg-laying, but the exact increase is impossible to determine due to their egg-laying habits (they lay individual eggs sporadically across the landscape).

Future design improvement analysis will be completed after Phase 3 test and evaluation.  However, initial test results suggest that less LEDs are required than initially believed.  Less LEDs would significantly reduce the price and therefore, the breakeven point.  This would make the fixture more competitive and/or more profitable.  The fixture should also be designed for PWM controllers in order to expand the market.  As power costs increase globally and the demand for efficient fixtures increases, this design should meet the user’s needs along with the aquarium inhabitant’s.

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed or implied in this paper are those of the author and should not be construed as carrying the official sanction of the University of Dayton, the Engineering Department, or of individuals/groups mentioned in this paper.  This project is for informational purposes only, and it should not be used replace proper electrical engineering training before attempting such a project.  Any projects arising from this paper are at the reader’s own risk.  Additionally, this report and analysis shall not be used for commercial and/or profit without the author’s explicit written permission and any permission required from the University of Dayton.

References

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