«

»

Gryphon C-40 Band Saw

Gryphon C-40 Band Saw:  A+

Gryphon C-40 Band Saw

Gryphon C-40 Band Saw

One thing I’ve found in rescuing corals is that they often need extreme fragging – to remove necrotic tissue, invasive sponges, and nuisance algae.  It was finally time I stepped up from bone cutters to the big time.  After reading report after report of businesses and hobbyists stepping up from the Inland saws to the Gryphon, I decided to consider the Gryphon C-40 as well.  When I found the saw for less than $300 including shipping at Aquarium Specialty, I decided to pull the trigger.  As a quick aside, I ordered from AS on a Wednesday, and I received the saw on a Monday…that’s crazy fast!

Gryphon makes all sorts of glass cutting saws and grinders, and their products are frequently used in the stained glass and lapidary professions.  The C-40 is a nearly completely plastic saw with a diamond blade…i.e. you couldn’t ask for much more in a fragging saw.

Packaging was great on the saw.  The packaging was clearly designed especially for the saw, and it was what I’d expect from an actual professional packaging engineer.  The cardboard was extra-thick.  Just…excellent.

The saw itself was made of high-quality extra-thick plastic, and even plastic lock-nuts came with it.  The blade was very thin, which made for very thin cuts.

Lower Blade Wheel

Lower Blade Wheel

Two sponges came with it to help reduce splattering (and, there were special groves moulded into the saw in which to place the sponges.)  Most companies try to get every penny they can with proprietary accessories, but the saw instructions explicitly stated to just cut up kitchen sponges as replacements if the originals wore out.

Blade Protection with Sponge

Blade Protection with Sponge

The actual cutting was nearly as smooth as butter, once I figured out the adjustment screw (quite wobbly before that.)  I was able to make very accurate and precise cuts.  Although the blade goes up to 40 mph according to the manufacturer, I felt very comfortable around it (of course, wearing safety glasses.)

Cut Coral Skeleton

Cut Coral Skeleton

Smooth Cut

Smooth Cut

When it was time for cleanup, I found out what the weird random hole was for…a pouring spout!

Water Spout

Water Spout

Another great thing was that a few extra screws, lock nuts, and blade guides came with the setup.  The instructions were also pretty clear (not the best, but not bad either), and assembly only took a few minutes.

Overall, the quality was superb, and the system felt like a true professional setup (even though it was plastic.)  My only complaints were that the motor wobbled and was slightly irksome to adjust, the instructions were printed a bit too small, and that the price tag is probably out of a reasonably affordable range for many (although, here, I felt the quality was worth it.)  Even with its downsides, I still give the Gryphon C-40 band saw an A+.  Keep up the great work!

1 comment

1 ping

  1. HuyTV

    I like the way blades are protected with Sponge!

  1. The Reef’d Up Rescue Project » Reef'd Up Aquatics

    […] and many other solutions.  I also use a microscope to help identify pests correctly and a Gryphon band saw to help remove necrotic tissue and skeletal matter (think amputation for corals.) Various […]

Leave a Reply