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Rescuing Dying Corals: Introduction

No, this isn’t another post about how we should save the oceans, global warming, and all that.  This is how to literally save that pathetic bleached coral lingering on in the back corner of the bottom tank in your local fish store.

What started as a way for me to be my cheap self and still get corals blossomed into a full-up rescue addiction.  And why not?  There are shelters all across the world for abused and neglected animals, but I have yet to find one for corals!
Before:
Trachyphyllia Before
 After:
This all started when I walked into a local fish store, and I saw what remained of their latest shipment.  Due to weather conditions, the shipment was delayed, and most corals were near death.  I walked away with a quickly receding trumpet coral (Caulastrea furcata) and a bleached bubble coral (Plerogyra sinuosa) for $10.  I arrived home with no idea what to do.  But, it made sense that if something is sick, it should probably eat.  After a few months of hand-feeding and good water parameters, the corals were thriving.

Let’s face it.  We’re all too familiar with the starving sun coral (Tubastrea sp.), half-dead Favia, or the Acropora with slow tissue necrosis sitting in the fish store’s live rock bin.  These corals do not have to die.  Instead, let’s bring them out and do our small part to save the reefs.
Now for some gratuitous photos!
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After:
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If you can’t wait for the next installment of Rescue Corals, please see my thread on Reef Central:

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